BEET CHALLAH!

Beet Challah | Gorgeous Fuchsia Bread!
Friends, can we just take a second and revel in the magic of this lovely fuchsia Beet Challah? If you’ve been around here for awhile, you know how much I adore beets–especially in bread form. There’s just something so ridiculously cheerful about the bright, rosy dough!

Last February, in honor of Valentine’s Day, I shared my favorite Beet Bagels and ever since I’ve been on a mission to ruby-fy all bread. We’ve had a lot of beet pretzels and beetza (pizza with beet crust) around here.
But today, in honor of this Month of Lurv, I give you my favorite bread in all its beety glory!
Beet Challah Dough
Like a lot of kids, I pretty much hated beets but I think it’s because the only way we ever had them were fresh out of a can. They had that diluted, ghostly pink look and tasted metallic. Not the best way to make a kid fall in love with a root vegetable, right?
It wasn’t until I was fully an adult that I discovered the beauty of pickled beets. And then came roasted beets. And man, I was sold.
Beet Challah | Gorgeous Fuchsia Bread!
I love how perfectly the roasted beet puree worked with challah. My Pumpkin Challah Swirled with Chocolate actually inspired this flirty Beet Challah. I just loved how the pumpkin puree tinted that dough in such a lovely shade of orange and knew that pureed beets would have a similarly awesome effect on challah.
Beet Challah
It doesn’t take much in the way of beet puree to achieve this bright jewel tone but the result is truly lovely.
I couldn’t help sprinkling the challah with nigella seeds (though black sesame seeds or poppy seeds will work just as well).
Wouldn’t this beauty fit a Valentine’s spread to perfection?
Beet Challah | Gorgeous Fuchsia Bread!
While I still haven’t mastered braiding challah (one side always seems to end up smaller than the other), I just call my braids “rustic.”
This challah is perfect on its own slathered with butter but it gets even better with a schmear of cream cheese and a sprinkle of sliced green onions. Unfortunately, this loaf didn’t last long enough to turn into a batch of savory French toast but I have big hopes for the next one!
Beet Challah | Gorgeous Fuchsia Bread!
Finally, I meant to publish this post yesterday but Linus hit us with 16 inches of snow so I took the snow day to heart and spent the bulk of it getting back to one of my winter true loves: crocheting. So pardon the double post, but I had to share this with you ASAP!
Beet Challah | Gorgeous Fuchsia Bread!

BEET CHALLAH

Adapted from The Kitchn
1 cup warm water
2 teaspoons active try yeast
1/4 cup white sugar
1 cup roasted beet puree (pierre 3 beets with a fork, wrap in foil, and bake at 425 for an hour. Peel off skin and mash with a fork or blend until smooth)
4 1/2 – 5 cups all purpose flour
2 teaspoon salt
2 large eggs + 1 yolk whisked together (save the remaining white for the egg wash)
1/4 cup vegetable oil
nigella seeds (or black sesame or poppy seeds) for sprinkling
Pour the warm water into a large bowl (or the bowl of a stand mixer) and sprinkle with yeast and sugar. Let it sit for five minutes, until the yeast gets frothy. Add the beet puree and stir to combine. Add the flour and mix to just combine.
Add the eggs and oil and knead the dough for 5-6 minutes until it feels tacky (not sticky). If it is very sticky, add more flour.
Transfer dough to a clean, oiled bowl, cover, and set in a warm spot to rise for 1 1/2 – 2 hours, until doubled in size. Turn risen dough onto a flour surface and divide into 4 chunks. Roll each chunk into a long rope about 16-inches long.
Cover a baking sheet with parchment paper and transfer the dough ropes to the tray. Braid the strands following this tutorial. You can also just use three strands and braid the dough like you would hair. Cover the braided loaf and let it rise for another hour.
Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Right before putting the loaf in the oven, brush with the egg white wash (the remaining egg white mixed with 1 tablespoon of water) and sprinkle with nigella seeds. Bake for 30-35 minutes, checking at the 20 minute mark to rotate the pan halfway and to see if it is getting too brown (if so, cover with foil until it’s done baking). Cool baked challah on a wire rack until ready to serve.

I adore carbs–check out my Bread is Life Pinterest board for more carb-y ideas!

Beet Bagels with Whipped Blue Cheese

Beet Bagels with Whipped Blue Cheese

 

Beet Pretzels with Pistachio Pesto

Beet Pretzels with Pistachio Pesto

Pumpkin Challah Swirled with Chocolate

Pumpkin Challah Swirled with Chocolate

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